After the Table

Meet the Host: Dale M. Cain

Edited by: Raquel Venado | April 10, 2018

Dale Cain is a professional nutrition specialist with a passion for promoting good health.  An experienced On the Table host, Dale will focus her discussion this year on health disparities within the African-American community. She is founder and executive director of Advocates for Community Wellness, Inc.

Why do you think there is a health disparity between racial and ethnic groups?

What I have observed is that so many people of color are in a survival mode. Many are working, trying to provide basic things for their families and themselves. Sometimes that means you may have to work more than one job, pick up overtime whenever possible and not have time or the energy to follow your dreams and pursue your health goals.”

What drew you to host an On the Table this year?

I have been participating for the past four years, and last year was very successful. We focused on the eight dimensions of wellness (financial, social, emotional, physical, occupational, spiritual, intellectual and environmental health). They represent the quality of life. This year, the goal is to continue with that conversation and focus on health disparities in general. We want to have a conversation about them and learn what we can do at a community level to change the trend.”

What are some of the issues you would like to discuss?

We took a poll about which of the eight dimensions of wellness people felt that they needed more information on. Mental/emotional health was at the top. It is really about addressing the emotional state of being and how this affects every aspect of our lives.”

Why are these issues important to you?

In my research as a nutrition specialist, I came across one question that people struggle to answer: Why am I not doing the things I need to do? It really comes back to the fact that our spiritual and emotional health drive our behaviors.  It is important to spend more time having honest conversations about them so families and communities can take a deeper look at what is creating not-so positive behavior.”

What do you hope to accomplish through your table?

Our goal is to be an agent of change, starting with participants and their families, so that mental wellness resonates with the people they come in contact with most often and then radiates into their communities. Our goal is to have wellness workshops in every community.”

What advice do you have for people who will be hosting tables?

Whatever the table is, select something that you love and are passionate about and be willing to take it to the next level.”